Thursday, June 28, 2012

A Crucified Prism, or Gods and Lobbyists

At what point does God become our political ally?

For me, I used to think God was on the side of America, especially around 2004 and Bush (who I still like) was seeking reelection. It was very easy to think that YHWH had a personal stake in America reconstructing the Middle East into our image. 

Then things shifted for me. I began to wonder why God was on our side, and this became especially clear when more liberal Christians began to say he wasn't on their side, and our enemies were even more vocal (and active) about suggesting that He was siding with them. That made me pause.

So, who was right? Us? The other us in the camp that we don't like? Or the people we want to kill, and want to kill us?

Mind you, I'm very nervous about swinging the political pendulum in one direction so far as to alienate the message revealed in Jesus. I don't want to forsake the poor, but I don't want to become so enamored with pacifism as to allow people to slaughter other people.

So, what do we do? Is there some middle ground to occupy?

I don't think so.

I can speculate and say that if you really look into the Bible, you can see exegesis strongly supporting free market capitalism. Or socialism.

I guess the question is rather this: through what lens do we view the world?

I don't think it is as simple as voting Democrat or Republican or Libertarian. I don't see Jesus embodied in any of the political candidates or past American presidents. I realize this is highly idealized, so I'm not going to insist on such things in a dogmatic fashion.

Most Christians would say that they view it through Jesus. I think they are sincere and are doing the best they can. However, I would like to simply present this snapshot of what I think the kingdom of God looks like, and how this should transcend our politics.
Just something that crossed my heart.

--Nick

7 comments:

  1. Thought of Philippians 2. Powerful image.

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  2. I don't think Jesus ever weighed in on politics, or nationalism. His preaching was about the Kingdom of God and his actions were to heal and to love. Paul taaches us to accept the powers that be and John of Patmos hated and wanted to overthrow his powers that be. But Jesus taught neither.

    My ideas are currently heavily influenced by Greg Boyd, whom you, disposable soul, had the temerity to re-introduce me to on your blog, so I will take the liberty of recommending an interview with three evangalicals on this very topic. Gerg Boyd's first part starts at the 10:30 minute mark:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_SktYycndg

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    1. Thank you so much, Penn. I ate that interview up.

      --Nick

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  3. Heh. Reminds me of an article I read years ago by Ken Eckerty titled, "God is not a Republican".

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    1. LOL. I should read that. Link please? ;)

      --Nick

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  4. I grew up the same way. Republican = Christian.
    Also, I blogged about the same topic tonight.
    Is Jesus your candidate? http://redemptionpictures.com/2012/09/17/jesus-is-my-candidate/

    -Micah

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